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Bitter Balcony is ready like Freddy: first Elm St starts our Nightmare Week!!!

 
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A Nightmare on Elm Street

On an ordinary street in a small town, a legendary abomination wearing a torn red and green striped shirt, a dusty fedora and a handcrafted glove with knives was born. The monster was Freddy Krueger, a homicidal freak who terrorized Elm Street kids in their sleep, most of them unable to wake up in time to survive. Creator Wes Craven and star Robert Englund re-imagined the bogeyman into a sadistic prankster who enjoyed the mind-torture as much as the kill. In this first entry “A Nightmare on Elm Street," Krueger is at his malignant best (and so evil that he is referred to as "Fred" and not the comforting diminutive). Hey, who else but Krueger could make Johnny Depp turn into a blood geyser and still be liked?

In “Nightmare," heroine Nancy Thompson (Heather Langenkamp) attempts to escape Krueger’s grasp after her best friend Tina (Amanda Wyss) falls victim to him. Also stalked by Krueger are Nancy’s pretty-boy boyfriend Glen (Depp, what happen to that guy?) and Tina’s partner, bad-boy Rod (Nick Corri), who is a suspect in Tina's murder. As Nancy fights to stay awake, her separated parents, police lieutenant Thompson (John Saxon) and heavily-sauced mother Marge (Ronee Blakely) hold the secret of Krueger’s malevolence as a mortal and the clues to his ravenous rampage.

Released in 1984, “A Nightmare on Elm Street ” added Freddy to the new generation of ghouls along with Jason Voorhees and Michael Myers. While this first chapter takes the most serious approach to Krueger, Craven can’t quite escape the corniness of bad dialogue, poor acting, and holes in logic and character behavior (Marge is the poster mom for bad parenting).

Still, “Nightmare” rises above the rest of the 1980’s monster revival in a mood and romanticism rooted from the 1970’s Italian horror schlock from Lucio Fulci and Dario Argento. Scenes from “Nightmare," like the deviant shot of Freddy’s glove emerging from Nancy’s bathtub hold an eerie beauty. Aided by Charles Bernstein’s perversively minimalist score and some unique lighting choices by cinematographer Jacques Haitkin, Wes Craven’s charred demon is stamped in American horror history.

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Trailer:

Official Site:
Bitter Balcony is ready like Freddy: first Elm St starts our Nightmare week!!!

Credits:

Directed by: Wes Craven
Written by: Wes Craven
Starring: Robert Englund, Heather Langenkamp, John Saxon, Johnny Depp





Source of the Bitter: John Rojas

Comments, rants and other stuffs below
JAS on Mon, 04/26/2010 - 3:57pm

The score totally kicks ass in the first one. I also like that he's always poorly lit and is a real son of a bitch. :)

Long live sadistic Fred!

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