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Deconstructing James: The Balcony Visits Skyfall!!!

Bitter, Bitter Balcony, Movie Review, Skyfall 2012Robert Wade, Neal Purvis, John LoganSam MendesDaniel Craig, Javier Bardem, Judi DenchIan Fleming Bitter,Bitterometer,meter Skyfall(2012)
 

"Everybody needs a hobby” is the snide James Bond (Daniel Craig) remarks while tied to a chair by his nemesis Silva (Javier Bardem) as he attempts to convince 007 to join his extortionist army. Silva takes a moment to ponder a reply, and simply retorts “What’s yours?” to which Bond, in all his cocksure, unwavering glory states, “resurrection.” After a five decade reign as one of cinema’s enduring characters, this verbal confrontation between hero and villain is an introspective pause disguised as Silva’s grand entrance. “Skyfall,” Bond’s 23rd adventure, is one of the few Bond films that dwells into the panache of the debonair British agent’s motif, and exhumes a man who has been afflicted by tragedy and age. “Skyfall” is about James Bond’s resurrection, a deconstruction of a myth that travels back in time.

When a file containing the identities of MI6 agents around the globe is stolen, James Bond is sent by M (Judi Dench) to retrieve it. As to be expected, “Skyfall” opens with amazing high speed car chases, a motorcycle race on rooftops, and an epic battle on a train in the dazzling backdrop of Turkey. These sequences usually find Bond triumphant, with his penchant smirk to chalk up another mission accomplished. However, Bond gets shot twice, the second time by mistake from his novice partner Eve (Naomie Harris) that drops Bond from a locomotive to a long dive into a cold river. Bond fails, and for the fantasy Bond represents, failure is death.

Three months later, M finds her career in peril when the bureaucratic Mallory (Ralph Fiennes) pressures her to resign. To make matters worse, a bomb explodes in MI6 headquarters, killing several agents and operatives. An encrypted virus in M's computer reveals that this attack is due to a personal grudge against her. While cornered, M vows to not leave her post until “the job is done.” Re-enter: James Bond. Beleaguered and swilled, Bond comes back from his purgatory in a remote Turkish island, compelled by duty and love of country. Battling both internal and external forces, Bond and M fight for the integrity of MI6, as well avoiding redundancy in a Modern age.

“Skyfall” sends Bond on a three continent mission searching for Sliva (Bardem is one of the most bizarre and sexually ambiguous Bond villains ever), the phantom-like mastermind behind the diabolic attacks. With the assistance of Eve and a new Q (Ben Whishaw), this time as a cheeky 20-something technocrat, Bond is re-introduced to the field that has converted to the digital age. Bond engages with Serverine (Bérénice Marlohe) a rare and mysterious beauty that serves as the intermediate between Bond and Sliva. The tenacious battle between both men lead from a desolated island in the Orient to the crowed subways of London’s Underground. Bond is left to find refuge, and an edge, in an old, regal mansion in the heart of the Scottish Highlands. Allied by the elder caretaker Kincade (Albert Finney), Bond seeks to protect M and defeat Sliva in the annals of his beginnings.

In "Skyfall," longtime Bond screenwriters Neal Purvis and Robert Wade, along with newcomer John Logan, find a fresh angle by exploring the maternal-like relationship between Bond and M. While love, and love lost, has been examined before (“Casino Royale,” “On Her Majesty’s Secret Service”), this time Bond is left to defend a different yet equally meaningful connection with a woman. Unlike Vesper Lynd in “Casino Royale,” who Bond spends equally hating and avenging in “Quantum of Solace,” Bond’s willingness to protect M is beyond reproach, rare for a man who usually treats women without empathy. On her part, M trusts Bond with her life even as she maintains a disciplinarian tone with her favorite agent. Both Craig and Dench are at their best exploring the script’s underline tension. Additionally, legendary cinematographer Roger Deakins (“No Country for Old Men”) elevates the stakes of how a big budget production should be photographed. An explosion of both colors and shadows, Deakins marries both the thematic beat of “Skyfall” with the elegant, vibrant style of this film’s beloved descendants.

Director Sam Mendes ("American Beauty") gambles the future of this series with a stunningly simple bet, that “sometimes the old ways are best.” The film has subtle, and not so subtle, hints of Bond’s cinematic journal; from a Macallan 50 year old Scotch dated 1962 (the year “Dr. No” debuted) to the reappearance of the Aston Martin GB5, Bond’s equivalent to Pegasus. “Skyfall” doesn't deny that Bond has cheated Father Time, finding vigor and credence past his Cold War exploits and six interpretations by handsome leading men. What makes “Skyfall” one of the best Bond films ever made is the excellent balance between the humanity and the iconography. Unlike his predecessor Marc Foster, whose “Quantum of Solace” distrusted the Bond shield, Mendes protects it in a chivalrous manner. “Skyfall” is a near-pop masterpiece that secures 007’s immortality.

Trailer:

Official website:
Skyfall

Pics:
Skyfall2012Robert Wade, Neal Purvis, John LoganSam MendesDaniel Craig, Javier Bardem, Judi DenchIan Fleming  Skyfall2012Robert Wade, Neal Purvis, John LoganSam MendesDaniel Craig, Javier Bardem, Judi DenchIan Fleming  Skyfall2012Robert Wade, Neal Purvis, John LoganSam MendesDaniel Craig, Javier Bardem, Judi DenchIan Fleming  Skyfall2012Robert Wade, Neal Purvis, John LoganSam MendesDaniel Craig, Javier Bardem, Judi DenchIan Fleming  Skyfall2012Robert Wade, Neal Purvis, John LoganSam MendesDaniel Craig, Javier Bardem, Judi DenchIan Fleming 

Credits:
Directed by: Sam Mendes
Written by: Robert Wade, Neal Purvis, John Logan
Based on work(s) by: Ian Fleming
Cast: Daniel Craig, Javier Bardem, Judi Dench


Source of the Bitter: John Rojas

Comments, rants and other stuffs below
John Rojas on Thu, 06/06/2013 - 12:03am

thank you.

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