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Green Lantern First Flight - like a little bird flower ready to blossom

 

Green Lantern (2009)

“Green Lantern” follows, er, Green Lantern… Actually, the story covers how Hal Jordon acquired the ring and his struggle to become a part of the Green Lantern Corps. Listen, this story was written waaay back when, so some suspension of disbelief is in order. There are other things to forgive - such as trusting a man named Sinestro. Really? No one sees this coming? I thought they were a super-advanced alien race around since before time.

Funny names and obviousness aside, the story is well handled, though I expected it to be a little more Earth-based. It is fine that it isn’t, but we all know that a live-action feature would take place on Earth for at least part of the film. There are some bothersome points such as Hal never really reacting to being thrown into a world (or worlds) filled to the brim with different sentient life forms. One has to wonder why the subject of religion is never covered in the stories of heroes who deal with, or are, aliens. Proof that there are aliens throws the majority of modern religions into the blender and hits “frappe.” The villain gets the obvious treatment, but thanks to superb voice-acting, you never really have a “roll your eyes” moment.

There is a scene where they explain that the source of power for the Green Lantern was hidden underground in a different dimension. You couldn’t just hide it in a different dimension could ya? Ya had to go and bury it underground, too. Bastards!

Direction is solid. Lauren Montgomery has proven to handle the animated film splendidly. Superman/Doomsday remains a shining beacon of what a great, animated, hero flick can be (next to “Batman: Mask of the Phantasm,” of course). The story moments (written by Alan Burnett) are handled well; the character is developed, though not with too much depth; and the action is entertaining to watch. It would be nice to have an extra 10 or 15 minutes (so that it runs to a full 90 minutes) devoted to pure character development, but you can’t win them all.

The animation of the film is handled well. Most of it is made hand-drawn with good, light, use of cel-shaded 3D mixed in when needed. The design is clean and effective. There are two long shots that almost seem to be inspired by old ‘70s sci-fi design, which were cool to see.

The movie really shines in the voice-acting department. The casting is great and the work is solid. Christopher Meloni heads up the cast as Green Lantern himself. Michael Madsen makes a vocal appearance as Kilowog. For some reason, I wanted to hear Kanjar Ro yell out that he worked for Dick Jones, and then I realized it was none other than Kurtwood Smith himself. The star of the show is Victor Garber as Sinestro. He is cold and calculating and just under over-the-top, so the character remains evil, yet still believable throughout.

There are a few interesting death scenes in the movie such as the one in a spaceship and was particularly ballsy for an animated superhero film. Thankfully, it was an alien and when it comes to aliens and/or robots, filmmakers can get away with a lot more. Don’t fret though: the film is still kid-friendly.

Side note: There is a link to a “Green Lantern” live action film at imdb.com. Ryan Reynolds seems to have been cast. Good choice, but I was kind of hoping that Nathan Fillion would get the role.

Last, but not least HERE is a live-action “Green Lantern” fan trailer:

Images:

Trailer:

Official website:

Green Lantern (2009)

Credits:

Directed by: Lauren Montgomery
Written by: Alan Burnett
Cast: Christopher Meloni, Victor Garber, Tricia Helfer, Michael Madsen, John Larroquette, Kurtwood Smith





Source of the Bitter: JAS

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